SFCC receives $3 million grant for Hispanic-Serving Institutions

SFCC’s Project Minority Academic Pathways to Success seeks to remove barriers Hispanic and low-income students face in achieving post-secondary success

College is one of 43 in country, one of two in New Mexico

Santa Fe Community College announces that it is one of 43 institutions across the country to receive a $3 million five-year, U.S. Department of Education Title V Developing Hispanic-Serving Institutions Program (DHSI) grant.

SFCC’s Title V DHSI Project, Minority Academic Pathways to Success (MAPS), seeks to build systemic institutional capacity to implement the Guided Pathways model – a transformational approach that removes barriers Hispanic and low-income students face in achieving post-secondary success.

Project objectives include the establishment of meta-majors, restructured developmental math education, enhanced support and advising systems, and faculty and staff professional development.

U.S. Department of Education, Title V, Part A of the Higher Education Act, is providing $3 million (93 percent of project funds) to support this five-year project. The SFCC Foundation is raising an additional $225,000 (7 percent of project funds) of dollar-for-dollar match that establishes an endowment fund for minority and low-income student scholarships.

SFCC President Becky Rowley, Ph.D., said, “U.S. Department of Education’s Title V Developing Hispanic-Serving Institutions Program, is key to achieving educational equity among Hispanic and low-income residents in northern New Mexico. This funding will assist SFCC to equip students with the skills, knowledge and resources they need to prosper in tomorrow’s economy.”

U.S. Senator Martin Heinrich said, “Santa Fe Community College serves a tremendous role in northern New Mexico and beyond by educating our students and training our workforce. I’m pleased this grant will help advance SFCC’s transformative approach to supporting Hispanic and low-income students achieve post-secondary success and develop the next generation of leaders in our state. I remain committed to doing all I can to put higher education within reach for every student in New Mexico, and ensure that educators have the resources, training and support they need for students to succeed.”

SFCC goals for the MAPS project:

Goal 1:

Increase Hispanic and low-income student retention, graduation, and transfer rates by implementing Guided Pathways, including the establishment of meta-majors, restructured developmental math education, and clear pathways to careers and further education.

Goal 2:

Increase Hispanic and low-income student retention rates through enhanced support and advising systems, and intervening when students are off track.

Goal 3:

Strengthen Guided Pathways and student support systems through faculty and staff professional development that focuses on Hispanic and low-income student success.

Background:

In 2017-18, SFCC educated 7,684 students, and 69% of first-time full-time students were Hispanic. Currently, only 41% of SFCC full-time Hispanic and low-income freshmen remain enrolled in SFCC after their first year, only 21% graduate within three years, and only 15% transfer to a four-year college or university after graduation. While Hispanic students represent the majority of degree-seeking students, they are placed into developmental education courses at significantly higher rates (Math-92%; English-81%)11 than their non-Hispanic peers.

SFCC Student Body Characteristics*
Hispanic Students First-Generation Students Low Income Students Combined Hispanic & Low Income First-Year Retention

Rate

Graduation Rate Transfer Rate
69% 81% 61% 72% 51% 22% 20%
Hispanic and Low-Income: 41% 21% 15%
*2017-2018 First-time, full-time degree-seeking students
11 SFCC Office of Institutional Planning and Institutional Effectiveness (OPIE, 2019).

 

SFCC is one of the 400+ (and growing) Hispanic-Serving Institution (HSI).

A HSI is defined as an institution of higher education that—
(A) is an eligible institution; and
(B) has an enrollment of undergraduate full-time equivalent students that is at least 25 percent Hispanic students at the end of the award year immediately preceding the date of application.

Title V grants are highly competitive — 43 recipients were selected for funding across the country from a pool of 223 formal applications in the 2019 cycle. The MAPS project will benefit current SFCC students, as well as thousands who will follow in the future. SFCC students will have an improved institutional structure that supports students in achieving completion.

A cross-functional team of faculty and staff will implement the five-year MAPS project led by SFCC’s Director of Planning and Quality Julie Gallegos as the Project Director. For more information, contact her via email at julia.gallegos@sfcc.edu or call 505-428-1520.

11 SFCC Office of Institutional Planning and Institutional Effectiveness (OPIE, 2019).


For more than three decades, Santa Fe Community College has served as the gateway to success for individuals and the community. SFCC provides affordable, high quality educational programs that serve the social, cultural, technological and economic needs of a diverse community. The college serves more than 15,000 students per year in its credit, noncredit and adult education programs. For further information, visit the website or call 505-428-1000. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.