Equity FAQ

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Introduction

Category: Equity
  • If you go by a name that is different from your legal name you can fill out this form here and submit it to enrollment-admissions@sfcc.edu. By doing this, the name you go by will be displayed on Canvas, Office 365, Outlook, Teams, Course Rosters for faculty to view, and can be put on the front of your student/employee ID. Do keep in mind that it will take us time to upgrade and change technology to contain preferred names. Below is more general information about the process and the policy can found here with more detailed information.
  • Can I change my email address and username to match my preferred name? Yes. You should fill out the Change of Personal listed above first. Once this is completed you can request that OIT change your email address and username to match your preferred name. This will impact your ability to login, therefore, OIT suggests requesting this in between semesters or early in the semester if possible. Use this link to start a ticket: https://w3.sfcc.edu/oit/support/request. Alternatively, call us at (505) 428-1222.
  • What are the rules?
    • Preferred name only refers to first name.
    • Your preferred name can’t be vulgar or offensive.
    • Your preferred name can’t be intended to cause confusion or be a misrepresentation.
    • You can only request one preferred name per calendar year.
  • Where will my legal name continue to be visible?
    • Many Ellucian banner pages or forms.
    • Student surveys
    • Rave  
    • Back of Student ID
  • SFCC is required to use your legal name on many documents. These include, but are not limited to:
    • Transcripts
    • Diplomas
    • Tax Documents
    • Student Billing
    • Paychecks
    • Financial Aid documents

Category: Equity

The President’s Diversity Advisory Committee (PDAC) is the campus group that informs and drives the equity and inclusion activities, policies, professional development, initiatives and public statements. PDAC is a group that works directly with the President of SFCC and has representatives from students, staff, faculty and administration. You can find out more about the group here.

Category: Equity

A group of representatives at SFCC that included students, staff, faculty and administrators developed an equity statement as well as a pronoun statement for the college. This statement can be found here and is what drives our work related to equity and inclusion on campus.

Category: Equity

The group that put this page together is a subcommittee of the President’s Diversity Advisory Committee (PDAC) tasked with putting together current and relevant information about equity and inclusion and campus policies, activities, and initiatives related to these topics. 


Terminology

Citations are provided within some of the terminology.  Note these two sources provided, when used, are abbreviated at the end of the terminology.

  • MP Associates, Center for Assessment and Policy Development and World Trust Educational Services, 2019.
  • (MPA) next to term indicates this citation
  • Miller, s. (2019). about gender identity justice in schools and communities. New York: Teachers College Press.
  • (sM),  next to term indicates this citation

Category: Equity
  • White privilege refers to the unquestioned and unearned set of advantages, entitlements, benefits and choices bestowed on people solely because they are white. Generally white people who experience such privilege do so without being conscious of it.

    Structural White Privilege is a  system of white domination that creates and maintains belief systems that make current racial advantages and disadvantages seem normal. The system includes powerful incentives for maintaining white privilege and its consequences, and powerful negative consequences for trying to interrupt white privilege or reduce its consequences in meaningful ways. The system includes internal and external manifestations at the individual, interpersonal, cultural and institutional levels.  (MPA)

Category: Equity

Trans*+ is technically synonymous, though etymologically different from, trans, trans*, and transgender. It is the experience of having a gender identity that is different from one’s biological sex, or identify outside of the binary altogether. A trans*+ (trans, trans*, and transgender) person may be pre- or post-operative and is not defined by any predetermined gender formula. This term has become an umbrella term for nonconforming gender identity and expression. Trans*+, when written with an asterisk and superscript plus sign, de-notes transgender identities that continue to emerge. Trans* with only an asterisk denotes a segment of the transgender population that was inclusive of only some trans people’s identities, while excluding others. (sM)

Category: Equity

Structural Racism is the normalization and legitimization of an array of dynamics – historical, cultural, institutional and interpersonal – that routinely advantage whites while producing cumulative and chronic adverse outcomes for people of color. Structural racism encompasses the entire system of white domination, diffused and infused in all aspects of society including its history, culture, politics, economics and entire social fabric. Structural racism is more difficult to locate in a particular institution because it involves the reinforcing effects of multiple institutions and cultural norms, past and present, continually reproducing old and producing new forms of racism. Structural racism is the most profound and pervasive form of racism – all other forms of racism emerge from structural racism. (MPA)

Category: Equity

Settler colonialism refers to colonization in which colonizing powers create permanent or long-term settlement on land owned and/or occupied by other peoples, often by force. This contrasts with colonialism where the colonizer’s focus is only on extracting resources back to their countries of origin, for example. Settler Colonialism typically includes oppressive governance, dismantling of Indigenous cultural forms, and enforcement of codes of superiority (such as white supremacy). Examples include white European occupations of land in what is now the United States, Spain’s settlements throughout Latin America, internment of Asians in the United States imposed by hegemonic structures and beliefs, and the Apartheid government established by White Europeans in South Africa. (MPA)

Category: Equity

Restorative Justice is a theory of justice that emphasizes repairing the harm caused by crime and conflict. It places decisions in the hands of those who have been most affected by a wrongdoing, and gives equal concern to the victim, the offender, and the surrounding community. Restorative responses are meant to repair harm, heal broken relationships, and address the underlying reasons for the offense. It emphasizes individual and collective accountability. Crime and conflict generate opportunities to build community and increase grassroots power when restorative practices are employed.  (MPA)

Category: Equity

Racial equity is the condition that would be achieved if one’s racial identity no longer predicted, in a statistical sense, how one fares. When we use the term, we are thinking about racial equity as one part of racial justice, and thus we also include work to address root causes of inequities not just their manifestation. This includes elimination of policies, practices, attitudes and cultural messages that reinforce differential outcomes by race or fail to eliminate them.  (MPA)

Category: Equity

Racism is when a dominant “racial” group has the power to carry out systematic discrimination through the institutional policies and practices of the society and by shaping the cultural beliefs and values that support those racist policies and practices.

  • Racism = race prejudice + social and institutional power
  • Racism = a system of advantage based on race
  • Racism = a system of oppression based on race
  • Racism = a white supremacy system  (MPA)

Category: Equity

Queer, despite the negative historical use of this term, has been embraced in the last few decades, particularly by younger members of the larger and ever-growing LGBTQIA+ community. It is an umbrella term that many prefer, both because of convenience (easier than gay, lesbian, etc.) and because it does not force the person who uses it to choose a more specific label for drawing on historical definitions of gender identity or sexual orientation. Queer also refers to a suspension of rigid gendered and sexual orientation categories and is underscored by attempts to interrogate and interrupt heteronormativity, reinforced by acknowledging diverse people across gender, sex, emotions and desires. It embraces the freedom to move beyond, between, or even away from, yet even to later return to, myriad identity categories. Queer is not relegated to LGBTQIA+ people, but is inclusive of any variety of experience that transcends what has been socially and politically accepted as normative categories for gender and sexual orientation.(sM)

Category: Equity

Microaggressions are the everyday verbal, nonverbal, and environmental slights, snubs, or insults, whether intentional or unintentional, which communicate hostile, derogatory, or negative messages to target persons based solely upon their marginalized group membership.

Category: Equity

Intersectionality holds that the classical models of oppression within society, such as those based on race/ethnicity, gender, religion, nationality, sexual orientation, class, species or disability do not act independently of one another; instead, these forms of oppression interrelate creating a system of oppression that reflects the ‘inter-section’ of multiple forms of discrimination … ” (Ritzer, 2009, p. 1). There is  not one theory of intersectionality, but different conceptualizations and theoretizations of it, including different terms/phrases such as “multiple jeopardy” (King, 1988); “vectors of oppression and privilege” (Ritzer, 2009); “interlocking system” (Combahee River Collective, 1977). (MPA)

Category: Equity

Institutional racism refers specifically to the ways in which institutional policies and practices create different outcomes for different racial groups. The institutional policies may never mention any racial group, but their effect is to create advantages for whites and oppression and disadvantage for people from groups classified as people of color.  (MPA)

Category: Equity

Indigenous populations are composed of the existing descendants of the peoples who inhabited the present territory of a country wholly or partially at the time when persons of a different culture or ethnic origin arrived there from other parts of the world. Indigenous populations were overcome, by conquest, settlement or other means and reduced them to a non-dominant or colonial condition. Many  today live more in conformity with their particular social, economic and cultural customs and traditions than with the institutions of the country of which they now form part and live under a state structure which incorporates mainly national, social and cultural characteristics of other segments of the population which are predominant. 

Category: Equity

Implicit Bias known as unconscious or hidden bias,  are negative associations that people unknowingly hold. They are expressed automatically, without conscious awareness. Many studies have indicated that implicit biases affect individuals’ attitudes and actions, thus creating real-world implications, even though individuals may not even be aware that those biases exist within themselves. Notably, implicit biases have been shown to trump individuals’ stated commitments to equality and fairness, thereby producing behavior that diverges. (MPA)

Category: Equity

Gender Identity is how an individual feels about themselves, intuits, and then writes themselves into the world. Gender identity is how some-one wants to be seen and legitimated through the eyes of another in the world—just as someone is. Understood and fashioned in these ways, gender identity can be the embodiment of gender, or lack thereof, and any expressions of the self that are reinforced by how we think and want others to see and think of ourselves. Gender identity can therefore be the physical, emotional, and/or psychological embodiment that rejects gender- (a)gender- altogether. (sM)

Category: Equity
  • Diversity includes all the ways in which people differ, and it encompasses all the different characteristics that make one individual or group different from another. It is all-inclusive and recognizes everyone and every group as part of the diversity that should be valued. A broad definition includes not only race, ethnicity, and gender, but also age, national origin, religion, gender identity, disability, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, education, marital status, language, and physical appearance (etc.). It also involves different ideas, perspectives, and values.

It is important to note that many activists and thinkers critique diversity alone as a strategy. For instance, Baltimore Racial Justice Action states: “Diversity is silent on the subject of equity. In an anti-oppression context, therefore, the issue is not diversity, but rather equity. Often when people talk about diversity, they are thinking only of the “non-dominant” groups.” It carries  the connotation that something is being either implicitly, or explicitly, compared to and/or contrasted with some real or imagined ‘norm’ “and is  signifier of everything and yet nothing; it is conveniently unspecific” (Morrishand O’Mara , 2011) 

While diversity efforts on college campuses have brought attention to the vast differences among students—including gender, religion, sexual orientation, etc.—the term diversity fails to address issues surrounding race/ethnicity and does not account for the different histories, needs, interests, and issues affecting distinct groups of students on campus. (Occasional Paper, 2013)

Category: Equity

Chicano/a identity was widely reclaimed in the 1960s and 1970s by Mexican Americans as a means of asserting their own ethnic, political, and cultural identity while rejecting and resisting assimilation into whiteness, systematic racism and stereotypes, colonialism, and the American nation-state.

Latinx or Chicanx demonstrates a gender neutral or non-binary stance with those not included in the gendered uses of Latina/o and Chicana/o.

Hispanics are people from Spain or from Spanish-speaking countries in Latin America.

Latin@ is commonly used amongst Spanish populations, and demarcates a non-gendered person. Latin@ maintains the reference to both “a” and “o” endings in Spanish. This notation , the @,  maintains the masculine and feminine duality that exists in Spanish, thereby constraining the writer to dichotomous conceptions of Spanish.

LGBTQIA+- is an acronyms which  has become more commonplace in regular everyday writing and discourse. While acronyms are never fully inclusive and always expanding, this acronym represents a continuum of people who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender (trans*+, trans, gender creative/expansive/affirmed),  queer/questioning, intersex, ally/asexual, + and too many others to name.

Black Americans– Society has shifted away from identifying Black people as African Americans because not all Black people  are from Africa. African Americans are Black Americans and some prefer to be called African Americans while others prefer to be called Black Americans.

POC is an acronym for persons of color (all non-white folx). 

BIPOC is an acronym  for Black, Indigenous and people of color (all non-white folx). There are some controversies with using this term among the POC community.

Filipinx  is born out of a movement to create space for and acknowledge genderqueer members of the Filipin* diaspora in the white-centric binary places their parents decide to move to (e.g. the United States). The term is also seen as a way to decolonize colonized identity.

MX is a title used before a person’s surname or full name by those who wish to avoid specifying their gender or by those who prefer not to identify themselves as male or female.

Non-binary Hebrew Project: https://www.nonbinaryhebrew.com  (Links to an external site.)

Indigeneity is a term originally defined and accepted in 1972 by the UN Working Group for Indigenous Peoples, but was considered too restrictive and was later amended to what follows in 1983.

Uppercasing the word Black and lowercasing the word white has taken on more usage in the past few years as a way to both reckon the oppression of Black Folk and amplify the crucial importance of shifting ideologies. Lowercasing of white in the same piece of writing serves to highlight this. If they are done in separate pieces of writing, it lacks recognition and effect. Thus, when put in the same piece of writing, this becomes apparent.


Initiatives

Category: Equity

PDAC had put together a group of people both within the SFCC community as well as the local Native American community to put together a land acknowledgement statement. That work is still under way. In progress.

Category: Equity

When faculty positions become available at SFCC, the hiring authority works with Human Resources to engage in a search that spans both local and national organizations including those like HACU (Hispanic Association of College and Universities). The goal is to create a large, diverse pool of strong applicants from a variety of backgrounds. SFCC has also reviewed job postings and interview questions to follow best practices in hiring so that there are no barriers to success in the process and there is a trained equity representative on each hiring panel. SFCC continues to evaluate its internal policies and practices to continuously improve the experiences of its faculty and staff to support the retention of employees of all backgrounds. 

Category: Equity

To be designated as a Hispanic Serving Institution (HSI) the institution must have an enrollment of full-time, undergraduate equivalent that is at least 25% Hispanic and then apply to be evaluated for specific requirements. More about these specific requirements and the White House Initiative on Advancing Educational Equity, Excellence, and Economic Opportunity for Hispanics can be found here

Category: Equity

SFCC Faculty, Staff, and  the Governing Board,remain committed to addressing equity issues that directly impact our stakeholders. The governing board’s policy on equity can be found here: (https://www.sfcc.edu/policy/sfcc-governing-board-policy-diversity/). PDAC stays apprised of local, state, and national politics and responds to areas of concern that directly impact our community.

Category: Equity

The SFCC Library has developed a collection of resources on anti-racist teaching, which can be found at Teaching Resources – Anti-Racist Teaching in Higher Education – Research Guides at Santa Fe Community College (sfcc.edu)

Category: Equity

SFCC is a data-informed institution, which means that it uses data to identify initiatives and for continuous quality improvement. For the academic year 2021-22 PDAC is working on a Campus Climate Survey to identify potential issues with the student experience that SFCC can address. The committee is also creating a set of reports that can be used to track the outcomes of its work and continually improve our practices. 

Category: Equity

SFCC’s strategic plan puts equity at its center and many of the goals are directed towards closing the equity gap by engaging in systemic changes at the college level. In addition, one of our institutional values is People and one way we demonstrate this is by celebrating diversity. For more information on the schools strategic plan and its goals and outcomes, please click here


Faculty, Students and Staff

Category: Equity

For every permanent job position posted there is a search committee convened to review candidates, complete first interviews and recommend candidates for hire. Each committee must have at least one trained diversity representative to ensure the committee maintains socially responsible practices throughout the hiring process. 

Category: Equity

There are currently mandatory trainings that relate to LGBTQAI+ issues that every employee at SFCC must complete and PDAC is working to improve and expand upon these trainings. There is also a resource site that faculty can access on diversity training and curriculum. 

Category: Equity

This kind of information is called demographics. SFCC uses demographic information to help understand the student population. It is also used to identify where there may be gaps in enrollment or other trends on campus that may need to be addressed. For instance, if there are more students of one gender than another as compared to the local population, then SFCC would look at reasons why that might be to see if there are initiatives that might be helpful in balancing that representation. 

Category: Equity

SFCC is a sanctuary campus and the governing board issued a statement to this effect, which can be found here

Category: Equity

Yes, undocumented students are welcome at SFCC. 

Category: Equity

A database on scholarships available to SFCC students can be found here. There are multiple scholarships on the list that are particular to women, American Indians, Hispanic people and more. 

Category: Equity

SFCC is committed to teaching Culturally Relevant Pedagogy (CRP). CRP is grounded in three tenets: (a).  “an ability to develop students academically; (b). a willingness to nurture and support cultural competence;  and the ©. development of a sociopolitical consciousness” (Ladson- Billings, G., 2005, p. 483). 

SFCC is committed to reflecting a Culturally Responsive Pedagogy which draws from aspects of students’ cultures in an asset-based approach. This means that course materials are relevant, and increases skill acquisition, engagement, and learning outcomes (Ladson-Billings, 1995). 

To assess student learning and outcomes SFCC employs Culturally Responsive Assessment  which is mindful of the student populations the institution serves. It draws from language that is appropriate for all students when developing learning outcomes, acknowledging students’ differences in the planning phases of an assessment effort, developing and/or using assessment tools that are appropriate for different students, and being intentional in using assessment results to improve learning for all students. It calls for student involvement throughout the entire assessment process including the development of learning outcome statements, assessment tool selection/development process, data collection and interpretation, and use of results (Montenegro,  & Jankowski, 2017, p. 10). It is  “an action-based, urgent need to create contexts and curriculum that responds to the social, political, cultural, and educational needs of students; it is affirmative and seeks to identify and institutionalize practices that affirm [Indigenous]; and,  authentic cultural practices of students” (Khalifa, Gooden, & Davis, 2016, p. 1278).


Policies

Category: Equity
  • SFCC’s Marketing and Public Relations Department focuses primarily on students of color in College marketing material. In the formulation of marketing decisions, MPR examines race, ethnicity, gender identity and other aspects of institutional data to ensure marketing material is proportionate to the populations we serve. In addition, we also recognize that the very institutional nature of “college” and “higher education” is systemically biased against students of color (and exacerbated during the pandemic) and impacts people of color disproportionately. In order to uproot systemic bias we must continue to push even harder to present and build SFCC as a space where students of color (as well as students from all overlooked and underserved areas) can feel at home. 

We exercise these equity guidelines in many forms, including the photos we select for marketing collateral, the choices of regional accents and inflections of the voice talent for radio and TV spots, providing Spanish translation when appealing to Spanish-as-a-first-language individuals, and maximizing our marketing collateral for the media consumption behaviors of people of color (for example: students of color rely on mobile technology at higher rates, thus we primarily design our digital projects as “mobile first.” 

We carefully monitor that college marketing materials accurately reflect the classes, services and outcomes we promise to deliver. We also use these marketing interactions to gather data and other information in order to continuously hone the quality and efficiency of future ca((MPA))igns and further appeal to the needs and aspirations of our students of color.

Category: Equity

Local police and paramedics are called to campus in an emergency situation when either our campus security needs help or when it is beyond their capacity.

Category: Equity

If you are unsure of who to reach out to when you have a concern or complaint please fill out our Complaints & Concerns form found here and it will get directed to and addressed by the appropriate individual. 

Category: Equity

SFCC’s Department of Human Resources maintains policies regarding equal opportunity of employment, discrimination and harassment. All of these can be found here. For information on similar policies as they relate to students click here. 


Governance

Category: Equity

SFCC’s commitment to equity, inclusion and belonging are the highest priority of the College.

All efforts and initiatives are anchored by equity, inclusion and belonging. This includes, but is not  limited to: SFCC’s infrastructure, institutional procedures, teaching and learning, assessment,  professional development, campus facility policies, data reporting, programs, marketing and public relations, technology, procedures, and program development, etc.

Category: Equity

The SFCC Governing Board  adopts for the College through its approval process to guide the work of the College (SFCC Policy 1-1). Each SFCC Policy has a leader who is responsible for remaining current with external rules and regulations, understanding and documenting the guiding principles, and developing the procedures for that Policy. This shared commitment to Equity guides the decisions that are made on behalf of, with, and for the College and its stakeholders. https://www.sfcc.edu/about/governing-board/


Local and State Resources

Demographic data can be found here

Spanish Speaking Staff and Faculty

Laura Mulry – French 

sj Miller– Hebrew and German